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Wednesday, June 29, 2022

The rise of the nude-dress or why fashion has insisted on stamping hyper-realistic nipples on clothes | Fashion

A few days ago, Kylie Jenner uploaded an image to her Instragram wearing a flesh-colored bikini with two life-size printed nipples along with the phrase ‘free the nipple’ (release the nipple). As expected. The image has already exceeded ten million ‘likes’. The bikini belongs to the capsule collection that the stylist Lotta Volkova has made for Jean Paul Gaultier, a revisitation of the designer’s archive designed to appeal to new generations (many are nostalgically returning to revive fashion milestones of the past on their social networks ) that includes the historical corset of cones that raised Madonna in 1990 or these garments with false nudes that the French creator designed no less than in 1984. “At that time you could experiment with real fashion, in an innocent way, without being afraid to be provocative,” Volkova said in a recent interview. In her collection, already sold out, there are also t-shirts and dresses that play with nudity as a trompe l’oeil and that different celebrities have worn in recent weeks. Even The Times sent one of its editors to Oxford Street with the garment in question to document the reaction of the people. Interestingly, Jean Paul Gaultier is not the only firm that is betting this season on printing or artistically alluding to the female breast. Glenn Martens at Y/ Project was inspired by the French archives to make similar garments and Jonathan Anderson at Loewe uses balloons or plastic structures to display them in a more Dadaist way. The Spaniard Sergio Castaño Peña, better known as Syndical Chamber, plays precisely with this trompe l’oeil idea of ​​nudity in most of his 3D-printed garments. His ‘anatomical dresses’ have dressed Iggy Azalea or Bella Thorne; A few weeks ago, Chanel Terrero donned one that faked that wet effect that hints at the female body. The Greek Dipetsa is another of those firms that play with draping and the wet look to erase the boundaries between skin and fabric, the English Sinead Gorey draws perfect bodies that work with life-size prints on tight pieces, an idea that has also used this season by Olivier Rousteing at Balmain. In the last decade, people began to talk about the so-called ‘naked dress’, a piece full of openings and transparencies that played to insinuate more skin than was socially accepted. The most famous, perhaps, is the one that Bob Mackie designed for Cher at the 1986 Oscars ceremony and that today is still remembered by everyone, precisely for that. The images of Rihanna dressed in a transparent fabric studded with Swarovsky crystals when she received the award from the Council of American Designers as a style icon in 2014 also went around the world and, more recently, Kim Kardashian dressed to attend the MET gala the Jean Louis Scherrer that Marilyn Monreo wore to sing Happy Birthday to President Kennedy; a jewel from 1962, also sketched by Mackie for the French brand and that hinted at the female anatomy through its cut and transparency. The naked dress has been around for half a century and, in most cases, its function was either to shock or to please according to the canons of the male gaze that have always surrounded women’s fashion until relatively recently. The idea of ​​this new ‘patterned nude’ is rather the opposite, it is not about revealing, but rather about hiding, not about pleasing, but about vindicating, not about showing the body by objectifying it, but rather ironizing with it by reappropriating it. With regard to this trend, the newspaper The Guardian shows the t-shirts with printed breasts that Vivienne Westwood created in the mid-70s, in full rebellious effervescence of punk. It would be necessary to advance to the last decade for similar garments to become viral again, when celebrities like Miley Cyrus joined the ‘Free the Nipple’ movement, which was born in 2012 with the homonymous documentary directed by Laura Esco and which tried to raise awareness of both the ban on women going shirtless (unlike men) in most Western countries as the double standard that continues to measure Instagram posts even today, where showing female nipples is often censored. After his show for next winter, in which the model Precious Lee was seen with one of these printed dresses, Olivier Rousteing, creative director of Balmain, explained that it is a metaphorical way of “fighting against the body dysmorphia that generates social networks”. Last fall, some leaked documents from Meta (Instagram’s parent company) revealed that the employees themselves were aware of the damage to self-esteem that filters, public exposure and the promotion of certain types of canons on this network generated among young people. In October, the platform changed its policy regarding nudity following an outcry caused by plus-size model Nyome Nicholas Williams, whose photos (without showing her nipples) were censored, as were those of comedian Celeste Barber for trying to imitate an image of a Victoria’s Secret model. Until then, Instagram implemented an arbitrary policy regarding nudity; According to different influencers, he gave the go-ahead to show thin bodies, but not bodies outside this canon. But the nipple remains a taboo subject for Mark Zuckerberg’s company. The feminine, not the masculine, which can be shown safely on the social network. Their symbolic load, always associated with the patriarchal gaze, makes Instagram continue without wanting to show them. As the writer María Bastarós recounted in an Icon article, “the woman’s body, nipples included, is shown or censored based on its erotic capital, its usefulness for the male gaze.” Nudity, breastfeeding ads and even the Parallel Mothers poster are censored, but not t-shirts with drawn nipples, despite, they say, cheating these decisions through computer recognition programs. How is it possible to differentiate the almost natural pattern of Kylie Jenner’s bikini from a real nipple? What difference is there, apart from the symbolic, between a dress that shows a natural nude and a body without a dress? The trend of the trompe l’oeil dress comes to add to another that has been imposing itself for some time; that of showing skin and that of wearing tight clothing, regardless of size. One of the authors of both trends, Casey Cadwallader, artistic director of Mugler, told in an interview in this medium that “today the idea of ​​sexy has more to do with sisterhood than with pleasing the male gaze.” However, the diversity of sizes and the feminine appropriation of the body (and its nipples) is only a thing of the catwalks. On the street, the best-known stores continue to offer restricted sizes and promote their products with models of canonical measurements that, of course, Instagram continues to promote and reward.

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– Article Written By @Leticia García from https://smoda.elpais.com/moda/el-auge-del-vestido-desnudo-o-por-que-la-moda-se-ha-empenado-en-estampar-pezones-hiperrealistas-en-las-prendas/

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