Hero of the 80s

Alfonso Zayes saves cinema with his comedy

MEXICO CITY (El UNIVERSAL) . – After actor and comedian Alfonso Zayes died of a heart attack last Thursday night (July 8), memories of his career, which included more than 100 film projects and television, were revived. went.

The memoirs feature iconic tape scenes such as “The Greengrocers”, “The Day of the Bricklayers” and “Three Very Pointed Boatmen” that were popular in the 1980s, but would today be considered offensive according to the “culture of cancellation”. .

“Cancellation culture” is a term that began in use in 2015 and became popular three years later; It is used to withdraw support for an event, whether moral, economic, digital or social, that is considered politically incorrect, questionable or that attacks social norms or ideals of movements. Because these are movies that were made more than a decade ago, it may be impossible to do many of the actions that make Zayes famous today.

censorship

These are the five scenes of Alfonso Zayes that could currently be canceled.

In the movie “The Greengrocers Attack Again”, Zayas and his friends are at a party with several women, but when they discover that they are transvestites, they not only use derogatory phrases, but also call them “Let’s go”. , they are men”. But apart from that they push them and leave them.

“You’re provocative with that fitted skirt,” says Zayas in a scene from the same film, where he clearly tries to flirt with a woman who goes to his grocery store.

“You need someone to take care of you,” Zayas tells a woman to convince him to have sex.

During the film “La Negra Tomasa”, where she shares the credits with actors such as Cesar Bono, a fight breaks out as a woman follows two men who not only praise her, but also argue that They have been with him.

In promotion of the film “The Day of the Bricklayers”, several characters happily dance to a song called “Oh, What a Pachanga”, some of them make comical contributions to the lyrics and are referred to as “dwarfs” on the pretext. . For a younger man, that just doesn’t have time to appear in Zayas’ films.

wicked and cunning and

The actor covered the spectrum of mischievous Mexicans who deftly and deftly conquered women, his characters mostly coming from the neighborhood, so money or a good job weren’t necessary.

Arturo Aguilar, film critic at W Radio, and Milka Ibáez, director of the film and comedy festival 24 Risas por Segundo, agree when they remember him.

“Zayas had an angelfish. Featurs movies, which were quite scandalous, saved the industry commercially (in the 80s), the public consumed them and continued to consume them when they were shown on TV”, says Milka. Huh.

“From my point of view as a woman, they clearly saw her as an object, but sympathized with her for being evil, although perhaps the stories were quite vulgar,” she adds.

Meanwhile, Aguilar believes that Mexican macho culture in those days saw the characters of Zayas as alpha males.

“He wasn’t rich but he had a verb and he worked in the trades (mechanic, polaro) and that was his value, what people saw as representing themselves. I would say it was a value judgment of people without was an honest reflection of her behavior,” he says.

relief

“In a certain way it was a replacement for ‘Don Juan 67’ and ‘Bachelor Department’ actor Mauricio Garce”, says Aguilar.

“It was watching how the cinematographic heartthrob evolved into the industry the public wanted to identify with,” he emphasized.

Several figures from the acting guild spoke on the death of film and television actor Alfonso Zayes.

Paco Ayala, a member of the Molotov group, reacted to the news of the comedian’s death. The rock band worked with the Mexican actor at some point: “It is a pity, any loss of a loved one is serious and sad, and we hug and send condolences to the family of Maestro Zayes. And yes, we have There was an opportunity to be with him in the video for ‘Parasite’ around 1999, I think, we recorded a video in New York and we had a great time. Later we found him on a few shows and we’re going to miss him (…) He was one of the greats.”