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Monday, August 15, 2022

He weathered storms, studied them, and today he shines as a meteorologist in Houston: Gaston Heredia from Tucumen

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When he first boarded a plane bound for the United States, it was December 2001 and President Fernando de la Rua was leaving Casa Rosada by helicopter.

Gaston Heredia of Tucumán, then 15 years old, did not fully understand the eruption, but knew the family had been settled. He hadn’t imagined that he had come out of the storm to go to the others. That disastrous path of Wilma awaited her in Miami and, in fact, the season took hold.

Don Heredia Sr. worked in Scania and unemployment took him by surprise, as did his wife, a tutor. With four minor children, he didn’t consider too many options. A family friend invited him to try his luck in the north and the man left a month before his family. With his lifetime savings, he rented a room in Miami Beach, bought a 1993 Dodge Caravan, and threw himself into a mechanic job. When he sent for the rest of the clans, Biggest Hurdle: The ticket money was kept in Corlito.

Scholar Gaston Heredia, in his native Tucumán during his childhood.

Scholar Gaston Heredia, in his native Tucumán during his childhood.

Mother and children finally set foot in the USA after Christmas. They settled in the town of Hialeh, in a valley between Biscayne Bay and the Everglades, a Latino region. While the father, without knowledge of English, sold water filters from house to house, Gaston, the second of four children, attended Miami Springs Senior High School. It felt like “in a movie, in a typical American high school.”

Lockers, cheerleaders, football teams. Gaston spoke Spanglish, but beyond linguistic distance, he felt an unfamiliar discomfort. He tried to integrate through “soccer”, the sport he practiced in his native Tucumán, and changed position 7 for the defender. Business was still uncertain.

The following year, they changed schools, relocating to Doral, a city in Miami-Dade County. He enrolled in the Doral Academy, “an institution, separate, semi-private, with a more Latin imprint.” The family economy began to prosper, his mother found a job in the kitchen of a pizzeria and his father tried to print goods and wash limousines, until establishing himself as a bus driver for a medical company.

The Heredia family in the 90s, prior to their migration to Miami.

The Heredia family in the 90s, prior to their migration to Miami.

In 2005, the disastrous Wilma that drove through Cuba, Mexico and the Florida panhandle was an eye-opening personal experience. “The intensity of the wind in the windows, the memory of my father trying to cover them, the supermarket without merchandise, the closed city. That was all very shocking and made its mark,” says Gaston, now from Houston. “Then in 2008 Hurricane Gustav came, power outages, traffic lights and downed signs. I was struck by the damage something like this could have caused. And I ended up defining my business with documentary. an uncomfortable truthby Davis Guggenheim, about Al Gore’s campaign to educate about global warming”.

for five years Studied Meteorology at the University of Florida, After interning at Univision Miami, her first formal job in that field came in 2011 at Climadata, a company founded by renowned meteorologist John Morales. He wrote weather forecasts for the islands of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

In 2012, after a job interview for Univision, he moved to Colorado. The news was received by director Luisa Collins, and despite the insecurities of the shy Argentine who didn’t know what it was like to stand on camera, an opportunity opened up on television. “Today I think about the importance of first chances, that someone trusts you more than themselves”, gets excited. “I sounded like an insecure kid. I learned the hard way. I had the science, but it was all a matter of practice.”

Tucumán meteorologist Gaston Heredia shines in Houston.

Tucumán meteorologist Gaston Heredia shines in Houston.

The first time in the air was “a nightmare”: “They made a huge investment to renovate the station building, majors from different cities came for the launch and I was paralyzed, in shock,” he recalls at the age of 35. “I had no control over the graphics system, they presented me as an expert meteorologist, They threw me to the lions. It was a disaster, but it was my fastest way to learn.”

After seven years in Denver and experience like forecasts for Boston, Washington, Orlando, Tampa, Wichita, Albuquerque and Las Vegas, Moved to Houston in 2019, Today Heredia works as the head of meteorology for Univision in that city and leads a group of five meteorologists. He can be seen explaining atmospheric conditions with humor and sending himself in with some didactic tricks, like Cook an egg “at a temperature of 158 degrees Fahrenheit” inside a vehicle in about 60 minutes.

There is no fixed schedule for the person who sleeps less and dreams of climatic events. Univision’s weather station operates almost 24 hours a day and the Passion does not allow long-term disconnection. Every day you can see him on the Univision 45 newscast from 11:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., but that’s just one sample of his broader role: his team’s mission is to make forecasts for different cities.

Heredia at her home in Houston.

Heredia at her home in Houston.

the story of Mr Hurricane like his compatriots Violet Yass, Mar del Plata woman who won four Emmy Awards and works a few meters from the studio where Jimmy Fallon drives, in New York. Miss Meteorology arrived with her family as a child in the 1980s and ended up on NBC.

TV weather presenter, Yas graduated from the University of Mississippi and today shares a profession with Heredia. An entire Argentine army shines in local media of this caliber: Belén Smol, for example, is a Buenos Aires graduate of the UCA (9 Emmy awards on his shelf) who hosts on NBC Philadelphia.

From Denver to Houston (1,600 km), Heredia’s life took a nostalgic turn. Now he misses the sunrise among the mountains, in an arid anti-frizz climate. Everything is damp in the great Texas metropolis and the rhythm of an exhausting work for Gaston, who finds refuge in the running among the trees and the thousand curves of Memorial Park.

An old teammate who leaks water at his base connects this Atletico Tucumán supporter to Argentina. It is a container that his grandmother gave to his father and has survived in the number of moves, several times in the hemisphere. “I order yerba through Amazon and I drink the bitter at home every morning,” he laughs. “My tune? I don’t speak Tukuman anymore, I went back to my province twice and now I hear him speak differently.”

In the air.  Gaston stands in front of the camera at Univision Houston.

In the air. Gaston stands in front of the camera at Univision Houston.

In Maya mythology “Hunracan” (one leg) is the god of storm fire, wind and storm, the heart of the sky. GH no longer fears that strange divinity. For his dedication, he received 9 regional Emmys with environmental stories or in the presenter or meteorologist category. His impeccable resume includes volunteering at the National Hurricane Center for Spanish Translation.

-Do you use an umbrella or are you one of those who prefer the freedom to get wet?

-use. The first thing I do when I wake up is check the radar. The day can be extremely dry, but I do it anyway, instinctively. One day I decided to buy an umbrella and it saved me many times.

Gaston Heredia, Tucuman meteorologist in Houston.

Gaston Heredia, Tucuman meteorologist in Houston.

Why do you prefer to predict hurricanes than tornadoes?

I love hurricane season. This is something that generates adrenaline, a bitter taste. Unlike hurricanes, tornadoes pass in a matter of seconds and those days are more stressful for me. We know there is a risk of tornadoes, area, time frame, but we don’t know minutes to seconds or the specific point. There you have to become aware one by one. It is like an earthquake with no precise way of knowing where and when. There is very little space to convey the message to the community. Conversely, with Hurricane you can prepare yourself mentally, keep track of the days of the storm, have more preparation tools, take that message to the public, and an additional interpretation of the information. can give.

From Tucumán to Miami, and from there to Colorado and then to Texas

From Tucumán to Miami, and from there to Colorado and then to Texas

Were you able to avoid the hail in your car or thus take advantage of your profession?

Once I got some benefit. I had to change work shifts and cover early in the morning. There was a possibility of a strong thunderstorm. I saw radar, torrential rain, lightning discharges, and when I checked I realized it was about to hail. My car was 25 minutes away from the storm in downtown Katy. I wrote to my friend Beto, I asked him to keep him indoors and I informed several colleagues. The size of the hail was reduced to half an inch. Another time, on Saturday, while monitoring the risk of tornadoes, in full transmission I look at the map and they mark the polygon where one was going. It was in the area where a friend lived. I messaged another friend in two seconds. Crazy thanked me.

Don’t Trust On this News and Website Maybe it’s Fake

Reference from clarin www.clarin.com

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